Suriname made a promise to itself and the rest of the world to cooperate in mitigating the effects of climate change. Much effort will be put into action that helps to protect the environment and find alternative, environmentally friendly ways to bring development for the population. This great promise was made two years ago, in 2019, in the United Nations (UN).
In order to alleviate the shortage in protective gear, the GCCA+ Climate Change Suriname Adaptation - Phase 2 Project, funded by the European Union and the United Nations Development Programme contributed by providing personal protective equipment (PPE) and cleaning supplies to theMungra Medical Center hospital.
The Global Climate Change Alliance (GCCA+) Suriname Adaptation Phase 2 is to support the country in adapting to the main effects of climate change by improving management of water resources and coastal ecosystems in ways that increase the well-being of coastal communities through gender responsive capacity enhancement. The GCCA + Phase 2 project has issued a call for concept notes for European Union / United Nations Development Programme projects. This 2nd GCCA+ project in Suriname supports the government of Suriname in adapting to the main effects of climate change by improving management of water resources and coastal ecosystems in ways that increase the well-being of coastal communities through gender responsive capacity enhancement.
The UNDP Country Office with the support of the UNDP Crisis Bureau in New York and the UNDP Regional Hub in Panama, and in partnership with the Association of Indigenous Leaders in Suriname (VIDS) implemented a Covid-19 Rapid Digital Socioeconomic Impact Assessment among 300 Indigenous Households in Suriname in 2020.
In Suriname, the fisheries sector is the largest in the Agricultural sector, with over thirty five percent of the production value and an export quantity between thirty five percent and forty percent of the total export. In 2020, around seven thousand (7,000) people were employed in the processing and supply of fish. Besides fishing as a means of livelihood, there are also tour operators who find their means of livelihood in the ocean.
To help mitigate and adapt to the effects of climate change and raise awareness among the Surinamese community, the Global Climate Change Alliance Suriname Adaptation Project (GCCA + Project), funded by the European Union (EU), in partnership with United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), supported the “Participatory mapping, ecosystem service assessment, and resilience against climate change,” project from May 2017 – December 2018. This project was coordinated and executed by Tropenbos International (TBI) Suriname in collaboration with the Center for Agricultural Research in Suriname (CELOS). The goal of this project was to enhance the community-ecosystem resilience to the effects of climate change and to achieve sustainable agricultural development by designing and implementing sustainable, agricultural production systems, in Pikin Slee, (an upper Suriname River area).
Biodiversity is important for people and nature. It provides countless services and products to society and the economy and is indispensable to human existence on earth. Examples of so-called 'ecosystem services' are pollination of food crops by insects, wood formation by trees, water purification by wetlands, but also natural beauty that you can experience outside.

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About Suriname

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541,638

Population

52.9%

Gini coefficient

$9,950

GNI

0.714

Human Development Index

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